Saudi Arabia executes 37 citizens for ‘terrorism’

Saudi Arabia on Tuesday executed 37 of its citizens convicted of terrorism, three years after another mass execution that ultimately led to a break in relations with Iran.

The latest executions were carried out in Riyadh, the Muslim holy cities of Mecca and Medina, the predominantly Sunni province of Qassim, and in the Eastern Province.

The men were executed “for adopting terrorist and extremist thinking and for forming terrorist cells to corrupt and destabilise security”, said the official Saudi Press Agency (SPA).

It said one person was crucified after his execution, a punishment reserved for particularly serious crimes.

At least 100 people have been executed in Saudi Arabia since the start of the year, according to data released by SPA.

On Sunday, four men were killed in an attack on a security services base north of the capital Riyadh in an assault claimed by Daesh. Saudi authorities arrested 13 “terrorist” suspects the next day but did not say where the arrests took place or if they were linked to Sunday’s attack.

‘Sectarian strife’

The interior ministry said some of those executed Tuesday were accused of “inciting sectarian strife”, a charge often used in Saudi Arabia.

Rights group Amnesty International, in a statement, said most of those executed were “convicted after sham trials that violated international fair trial standards (and) which relied on confessions extracted through torture”.

The executions were “yet another gruesome indication of how the death penalty is being used as a political tool to crush dissent” within the country, said Lynn Maalouf, Middle East research director at Amnesty.

The rights watchdog said 11 of those executed were convicted of spying for Iran, while at least 14 others were sentenced in connection with anti-government protests in the Eastern Province between 2011 and 2012.

Among those executed was Abdulkareem al-Hawaj, who was only 16 at the time of his arrest, it said.

The Eastern Province has seen bouts of unrest since 2011 when protesters emboldened by the Arab Spring took to the streets demanding an end to alleged discrimination by the government.

Recommended For You

About the Author: Web Desk

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *